Intergenerational shared sites are programs in which children, youth, and older adults participate in ongoing services and/or programming concurrently at the same site, and where participants interact during regularly scheduled planned intergenerational activities, as well as through informal encounters. The benefit of intergenerational learning goes far beyond the time spent together and has the potential to change outcomes for both the children and the elderly. 

Key principles of intergenerational Montessori

Cross-generational Activites

Improved Well-Being and Health

Improved Well-Being and Health

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Through first person storytelling, children receive living history lessons. By sharing experiences and  working side by side with aging adults, a greater awareness of issues facing both generations is achieved and the barriers which create ageism are broken down.  

Improved Well-Being and Health

Improved Well-Being and Health

Improved Well-Being and Health

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Increased self-esteem for both the children and the aging adults by providing a strong link to community through combined projects and problem solving. Improved interpersonal and communication skills for both populations. These interactions decrease social isolation for our aging adults and break down age-based stereotypes on both ends of the continuum.  

Life Long Relationship

Improved Well-Being and Health

Life Long Relationship

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Research tells us that social isolation of aging adults can result in more health issues and a 50% higher mortality rate.  In an intergenerational community both planned and organic interactions happen daily for both the children and the aging adults in the community allowing authentic, meaningful relationships to develop. Many families are disconnected, geographically from one another, intergenerational sites allow for these relationships outside of the family. 

Intergenerational Programing in action

Trailer for The Growing Season